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Table 3 Major themes associated with pursuit of care based on qualitative patient interviews, associated Health Belief model constructs, and suggested interventions to improve care

From: A qualitative study of perceived barriers to hepatitis C care among people who did not attend appointments in the non-urban US South

Major themes Associated Health Belief Model constructs Proposed interventions to improve care
Structural barriers: financial, scheduling, transportation, health-system level Perceived barriers Expand Medicaid; utilize pharmaceutical company drug assistance programs; educate patients on available resources and supportive care; aim for clinic responsiveness, ease of scheduling, and confidentiality
Stigma Perceived susceptibility
Perceived barriers
Provide education on harm reduction strategies; co-locate treatment for substance use disorder and HCV; educate clinic staff on creating a welcoming atmosphere
Ambivalence Perceived susceptibility
Perceived severity
Acknowledge and address the uncertainty related to having HCV; Focus patient education campaigns on ambivalence and the potential for treatment to relieve patients of the burden of uncertainty
Prior experiences of HCV disease and treatment Perceived susceptibility
Perceived severity
Perceived benefits
Perceived barriers
Explore patients’ or others’ prior experiences with HCV treatment; address favorable changes in treatment since earlier therapies
Patient-provider relationship Perceived susceptibility
Perceived severity
Perceived barriers
Perceived benefits
Self-efficacy
Encourage expansion of HCV treatment to where patients are already receiving care and have established relationships
  1. HCV hepatitis C virus