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Table 2 Willingness to use various device interventions for opioid use harm reduction among study participants

From: Willingness to use a wearable device capable of detecting and reversing overdose among people who use opioids in Philadelphia

Question Likely (%) Unlikely (%) N total
Would you be willing to use a device that would help detect if you are suffering an opioid overdose and be able to give you a dose of a medication to treat the overdose 69 (76%) 22 (24%) 91
While you are taking opioids, how likely would you be to wear each device?
A device that senses opioid overdose 70 (73%) 26 (27%) 96
A device that indicates the wearer is at risk of opioid overdose, like a medical ID 66 (69%) 29 (31%) 95
A device that straps naloxone to the body for a bystander to administer 52 (54%) 44 (46%) 96
A device that senses opioid overdose and administers naloxone, if needed 64 (67%) 32 (33%) 96
A device that alerts medical first responders that you have overdosed 68 (71%) 28 (29%) 96
A device that alerts bystander you may have overdosed 60 (63%) 35 (37%) 95
A device that monitors your vital signs 73 (77%) 22 (23%) 95
For a wearable device to sense opioid overdose, how likely would you be to wear each device?
A necklace 48 (51%) 46 (49%) 94
A cannula (e.g., small tube under your nose) 12 (13%) 84 (88%) 96
Skin patch on chest 42 (44%) 54 (56%) 96
Skin patch on upper arm 53 (55%) 43 (45%) 96
Watch-appearing bracelet 72 (77%) 22 (23%) 94
Wrist bracelet 69 (73%) 26 (27%) 95
Shoulder strap 21 (41%) 30 (59%) 51
Thigh strap 15 (31%) 33 (69%) 48
Chest strap 22 (23%) 72 (77%) 94
Glasses 24 (26%) 70 (74%) 94
Knee brace 16 (33%) 32 (67%) 48
Ankle strap 44 (46%) 52 (54%) 96